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Symbi Research Advisors

Iowa State Professors working with Symbi

Basil Nikolau

Scott Beckman

Iowa State University

Department of Materials Science & Engineering

Read Scott's Bio »

Kaitlin Bratlie

Iowa State University

Departments of Materials Science & Engineering and Chemical & Biological Engineering

Read Kaitlin's Bio »

Andrew Hillier

Iowa State University

Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

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Matthew Hufford

Iowa State University

Department of Ecology, Evolution & Organismal Biology

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Fred Janzen

Iowa State University Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology

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Malika Jeffries-EL

Iowa State University

Department of Chemistry

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Song-Charng Kong

Iowa State University

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Read Song-Charng's Bio »

Basil Nikolau

Ganesh Rajagopalan

Iowa State University

Department of Aerospace Engineering

Read Ganesh's Bio »

Ian Schnieder

Iowa State University

Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

Read Ian's Bio »

 

Research Advisor Profiles

Basil NikolauScott Beckman

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Materials Science & Engineering

email: sbeckman@iastate.edu

Website:  Dr. Scott Beckman

Dr. Beckman's research is centered around creating technologies that allow for resource use in a more efficient and intelligent fashion. This can be achieved by designing systems that are self-monitoring, which use imbedded sensor technologies for optimization. There is a continued effort focused on the development of new materials for sensor technologies and the energy scavenging technologies that can be used to power these devices. In particular, nanotechnology may offer an approach for developing low-energy high-efficiency sensing technologies for in situ application.  His research is focused on understanding the relationship between the atomic and nanoscale structure, the electronic structure, and the material properties. The ultimate goal of his work is to allow for the tailoring of the functional properties of a crystal to suit the desired engineering needs.

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Kaitlin Bratlie

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Material Science & Engineering and Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

email: kbratlie@iastate.edu

Website: Dr. Kaitlin Bratlie

The Bratlie group is interested in understanding biomolecule interactions with polymers through optical techniques in order to engineer materials for specific biological functions.  Several molecules produced through the foreign body response to implanted materials are examined with the relationship between structure and function being of key interest.  Through fundamental understanding of how material properties influence the foreign body response, rational design of materials for biological applications will be possible.

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Andrew Hillier

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

email: hillier@iastate.edu

Website: Dr. Andrew Hillier

The Hillier Research Group in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Iowa State University has interest and expertise in the following areas: electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering, surface and colloid chemistry, scanning probe microscopy, optical sensing (ellipsometry, surface plasmonics, etc.), high throughput experimentation, as well as atom probe tomography.

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Matthew Hufford

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Ecology, Evolution, & Organismal Biology

email: mhufford@iastate.edu

Website: Dr. Matthew Hufford

The Hufford group has a reserach focus in evolutionary and ecological genomics of crops and their wild relatives including local adaptation, gene flow and introgression, selection during domestication and subsequent crop diffusion.

 

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Fred Janzen

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology

email: fjanzen@iastate.edu

Website: Dr. Fred Janzen

Dr. Janzen's research interests involve the study of ecology and evolution, including mechanistic work at the molecular and organismal levels, field studies that document the importance of phenotypic variation, and a comparative view of the long-term consequences of this variation. To do so, his team often integrates molecular and quantitative genetic techniques with experimental laboratory and field studies, largely focusing on the impact of environmental and genetic factors in mediating the expression of physiological, behavioral, and life-history traits. Using these conceptual approaches in concert with comparative techniques enables them to assess important biological issues, including (1) the biological significance of diverse sex-determining mechanisms, (2) the impacts of environmental and genetic factors on variation in early life-history traits, and (3) the current and historical genetic and demographic structure of populations, with an emphasis on elucidating adaptive processes and solving conservation concerns.

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Malika Jeffries-EL

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Chemistry

email: mkessler@iastate.edu

Website: Dr. Malika Jeffries-EL

Professor Jeffries-EL’s research interest include the synthesis of novel heterocycles and conjugated polymers (CP)s or organic semiconductors, and the investigation of structure-property relationships in these systems. She has focused her efforts on the development of CPs due to their technological importance impacting a variety of areas including energy (solar cells), displays, (light emitting diodes), electronics (field effect transistors), and life sciences (sensors).

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Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Mechanical Engineering

EMAIL: kong@iastate.edu

WEBSITE: Dr. Song-Charng Kong

Dr. Kong’s research includes two main areas – internal combustion engine and biorenewable energy. The common theme of these two research areas is that both involve multiphase, chemically reacting flows. His research includes both experimental diagnostics and numerical modeling. The common goal is to increase the energy efficiency and enable the use of biorenewable energy. He teaches courses related to thermal sciences, including thermodynamics, heat transfer, combustion, and internal combustion engine.

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Ganesh Rajagopalan

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Aerospace Engineering

email: rajagopa@iastate.edu

Website: Dr. Ganesh Rajagopalan

Actively involved in research since 1976, Dr. Rajagopalan has researched many aspects of wind
energy such as rotor aerodynamics and wind energy conversion systems. His research has been
supported by DOE through its national labs, SANDIA and NREL as well as by local agencies such as Iowa DNR and IEC. Working with the government and wind turbine industries, Dr. Rajagopalan successfully stimulated the aerodynamic influence of terrain and other turbines. Dr. Rajagopalan is using CFD techniques to study the flow field and operational characteristics of rotating machines such as helicopter rotors, wind turbines, propellers, and ducted fans. His primary focus has been on developing computationally efficient methodology for rotor research. This methodology can be used for day-to-day design-related optimization as well as for advanced research topics such as computational simulation and optimization of wind power parks.

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Ian Schneider

Institution: Iowa State University

Department: Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering

email: ians@iastate.edu

Website: Dr. Ian Schneider

Dr. Schneider's research focuses on cell-to-cell communication that regulates the physiological process of wound healing as well as the pathological process of cancer metastasis. Recently, it was discovered that there is a paracrine loop linking carcinoma cells and macrophages during the early stages of metastasis. Carcinoma cells secrete colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). CSF-1 induces macrophages to secrete epidermal growth factor (EGF). EGF induces carcinoma cells to leave the tumor and to secrete more CSF-1, which in turn activates more macrophages. His group is interested in examining the signaling dynamics of this paracrine interaction as well as how this paracrin interaction operates spatially in mixed-cultures with varying densities and spacing of cells.

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